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2013 Transportation Education Intermodal & Rail Transportation Lessons ~ Spring 2013

2013 Transportation Education Maritime Transportation Lessons ~ Spring 2013

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UW-CFIRE

Support from: National Center for Freight & Infrastructure Research and Education (CFIRE) at University of Wisconsin-Madison http://cfire.wistrans.org

 

2013 Great Lakes Maritime Transportation & Ship-Building Lessons (03-12-14)
developed by Teacher Institute Participants

Maritime Transportation - Rick Brown, Licensed Captain, The
Maritime Academy of Toledo and Dr. Pete Lindquist, Dept. of Geography
& Planning, University of Toledo. What are those big ships carrying and how
does it impact our economy? Who works aboard ships? Visit a port facility.

ELEMENTARY


CAREER TREES – Stretch Your Imagination by Bonnie Levy, Sullivan Elementary School, Green Bay, WI                  

Grades 5-7; Career Exploration

Lesson Overview:  Elementary aged students will develop skills to identify careers that match their own personal interests.  The purpose of this lesson is to expand  students’ thinking beyond one selected career so they can see how related careers interact with each other.  Maritime careers in the ship-building industry will be used as an example.


Build A Boat: OPERATION COOPERATION by Bonnie Levy, Sullivan Elementary School, Green Bay, WI 
                 Grades 3- 5, Careers

Lesson Overview:  Students preparing for tomorrow’s workforce need to develop the skills to work cooperatively together.  There are very few careers that do not require individual workers to be able to interact productively with others.  This is true in the ship building industry.  Reports from employers suggest that successful workers have strong “soft skills”.  The National Careers Service lists the following as the top 10 “soft skills_ employers are looking for in new hires:  communication, making decisions, showing commitment, flexibility, time management, leadership skills, creativity and problem-solving skills, being a team player, accepting responsibility, and the ability to work under pressure.  In this lesson, students will have the opportunity to develop these critical skills while cooperatively building a ship.  


Detroit’s Strait Place on the Lakes by Mark Crowley, Detroit Public Schools
Grades 3, Social Studies

Lesson Overview:  Students will examine the geographical, navigational and economic role of the Strait of Detroit  by using maps, sample cargo, and reading trade books. Students will gain an appreciation of the importance of this waterway in state, national and international commerce and recreation. 


Moving Natural Resources on the Great Lakes by Mark Crowley, Detroit Public Schools
Grades 3, Social Studies

Lesson Overview: Students will use a Great Lakes map to trace the path of various natural resources on the Great Lakes and find out what these used for. Students will also walk to the Detroit River, visit the Westcott mailboat, and the Dossin Maritime Museum.


MIDDLE SCHOOL


“Did You See THAT Ship?” by  Carol A. Osborn, Mackenzie Prek-8th grade (Detroit Public Schools) 

Grade 6, Social Studies

Lesson Overview:  Students will investigate five types of ships which are docked on or travel the Detroit River:  freighter, ice breaker, fireboat, mail boat, or passenger cruise boat.  Students will be able to identify and explain why each ship is unique and how it makes an impact on the lives of Detroiters. 


“Wonderful Women Who Worked on the Great Lakes” by  Carol A. Osborn, Mackenzie Prek-8th grade   

Grade 7, English/Language Arts

Lesson Overview:  Students will develop an appreciation of the role that women played in the Great Lakes maritime industry during the 1800’s and early 1900’s through reading, online research, and writing.


Great Lakes Port Authorities: Surveying the Past, Looking Toward the Future by Robert Ziegenbein, Warren E. Bow Elementary/Middle School (Detroit Public Schools)                                

Grades 6-8, Computer Lab

Lesson Overview:  Students  will become knowledgeable about the thirteen Port Authorities that are located on the Great Lakes. Student groups will choose a U.S. or Canadian port authority to research its creation and history.  Students will also identify three challenges that the port authority faces for the future.  Students will use 1950 as a start point, or the creation of port authority, to research port authority data to determine cargo trends, i.e types of cargo, increase/decrease of tonnage, frequency of sailings and vessel types, up to current year. Students will also be introduced to vocabulary used in Great Lakes shipping. Student groups will create a presentation using PowerPoint and Excel.


Tracking a Freighter on the Great Lakes by Robert Ziegenbein,  Warren E. Bow Elem/Middle School        

Grades 5,  Computer Lab

Lesson Overview: Students will follow the movement of ships through the Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway System using  http://www.boatnerd.com , gaining an understanding of how the Great Lakes serve as a transportation highway in the movement of goods.  Students will also be introduced to vocabulary used in Great Lakes shipping. Student groups will pick two active Laker freighters, from Know Your Ships, and follow them over the course of 7-10 days on their journey through the Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway System. Student groups will create a presentation using PowerPoint and gain practice in web-based research.


Ore You Ready to Rumble? by Ryan Barron, Big Bay de Noc High School 
Grade 7, Social Studies

Lesson Overview: The purpose of this lesson is to encourage students to think about how everyday goods get in their possession. Many students don’t realize the amount of energy, resources, and planning that goes into creating and transporting a product. This lesson will introduce students’ to the different processes and modes of transportation that is necessary in order for us to possess goods. 


Does Your Duct Boat Float? by Ryan Barron, Big Bay de Noc High School 

Grade 8, Science

Lesson Overview:
The purpose of this lesson is for students to use the engineering design process to design and build a boat using duct tape and their creativity. Students will compete with one another to a see whose vessel will hold the most weight. This is a great hands on activity that will not only teach the students about buoyancy, vessel design, and engineering but it will intrigue the students to think more about how vessels are built and the challenge  of constructing 1000-footers that carry  tons of cargo on the Great Lakes.


HIGH  SCHOOL


Using Great Lake Maritime Facts in Dimensional Analysis by Alice Gryspeerd, Romeo High School

Grade 10-11, Chemistry
Lesson Overview:  In chemistry the students learn to set up math problems using dimensional analysis.  This is a stepping stone to stoichiometry later in the year.  The use of converting between different units and the use of large values in scientific notation are key components in a dimensional analysis lesson.  The use of maritime values and facts will make this lesson unique in a chemistry setting while exposing the students some interesting Great Lakes information.


Why Is Salinity Value Important in Ballast Water Management? by Alice Gryspeerd, Romeo High School

Grade 9-10, Chemistry & Biology

Lesson Overview:  Using the student’s prior knowledge of density, the students will research how to build their own hydrometer using a straw or Beral pipette.  The students will measure the density of 3-4 different liquids using a graduated cylinder and balance.  The students will then use their hydrometer and calibrate it using water as reference point.  The students will use this activity of hydrometers to relate it to the ballast water management of achieving a salinity of 30 ppt (parts per thousand) during mid-ocean ballast exchange.  The students will be asked to discuss why a difference of salinity can cause organisms to die (using hypertonic and hypotonic solutions and what does it do to cells).


Weather It’s Chemistry or Geometry by Chelsea Laurn 
Grade 10, Geometry, Chemistry

Lesson Overview:  This lesson, which takes place over two days, is focused on Boyle’s Law and the volume of a sphere. It is designed to give a real-world application to basic geometry and chemistry concepts, by addressing relevant topics, such as weather, weather balloons, and data collection.  Through images and data that can be found online, students will see the importance and application of geometry and chemistry concepts which will inspire them to take a greater interest and ask more questions regarding the purpose of events and actions that take place around them.


Life Cycle of Iron by Timothy J. Barron, Gladstone High School  
High School Physics

Lesson Overview: This lesson will be taught in an Environmental Chemistry class, which is composed of eleventh and twelfth graders at Gladstone High School.  The lesson will address the life cycle of iron ore and also the Transportation system that is present in the Great Lakes and will meet the Michigan objectives in this area. The unit will augment a mining and materials unit that is already in place. Emphasis of the lesson will be on the mining and uses of iron ore, the geography of the Great Lakes, the locations of several ports on the Great Lakes, the path of travel that Lakers take to deliver the ore, and the efficiency of Lakers compared to trucks and trains.


How Do Lakers Carry Such Tremendously Heavy Cargoes?  By Timothy J. Barron, Gladstone High School 
High School Physics

Lesson Overview: Students will construct a “Lakers”, using the Archimedes Principle, to show the real-world application of physics. The lesson will focus on the physics of shipping, the geography of the Great Lakes, the locations of several ports on the Great Lakes, the path of travel that Lakers take to deliver the ore, and the efficiency of Lakers compared to trucks and trains.


Converting Nautical Units by Vicki Howell, Menominee High School
High School Chemistry, Environmental Science and/or Math

Lesson Overview:  Students will practice converting units using a method known as factor label or dimensional analysis.  The examples will emphasize nautical units of measure.  Converting units is an important skill in math and science.  This activity will allow students to practice this skill while being introduced to some new units/vocabulary that relate to maritime transportation.


Great Lakes Shipping…In Our Backyard by Vicki Howell, Menominee High School
High School/College Environmental Science

Lesson Overview:  Students will research the Great Lakes Navigation System (GLNS).  Environmental Science and Maritime Transportation go hand in hand as society works to improve fuel economy, congested roadways and emissions issues.  This lesson will provide a general overview as to the advantages of maintaining and improving this complex system in our backyard.



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Last Update: March 31, 2013

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