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2011 Summer Institute & PDF
Lesson Plans (by teacher participants)

2011 Great Lakes Maritime Transportation Summer Institute

“Great Lakes Maritime” Lesson Plans

Great Lakes Maritime Transportation Units developed by
2011 Great Lakes Maritime Transportation Summer Teacher Institute Participants

ELEMENTARY

1. Pen Pals with a Great Lakes Ship, by Lynn Maki
1st Grade, Social Studies and Language Arts

Unit Overview
Students will write a friendly letter to a Great Lake Ship’s crew. They will use a map of the Great Lakes to locate the current position of the ship and follow its journey. By participating in this activity students will learn how to correctly write a five-part friendly letter. They will also learn the names and locations of the Great Lakes.

2. Aquatic Invasive Species and Their Control, by Patti Thunell
2nd Grade, Language Arts, Social Studies and Science

Unit Overview
Students will examine different aquatic invasive species and how they came to be introduced into waters of Lake Michigan, which is about 40 miles west of our location. Since this community is surrounded by inland lakes, which provide recreational and economic opportunities for residents, students will examine ways that they can protect the local waterways from infestation and produce posters that can be displayed at local marinas and boat launches.

3. Let There Be Light, by Beth Messman
3rd & 4th Grade, Social Studies, Art & Language Arts

Unit Overview
Students will learn about the history of lighthouses. Students will learn about some of the duties a lighthouse keeper was required to perform. Students will learn about the distinguishing characteristics of lighthouses. Students will examine photos of lighthouses in Door County, Two Rivers, and Manitowoc in order to identify certain characteristics. They will match descriptions of the lighthouses to their photos. Having learned about shapes, sizes, day marks and night signatures, students will create their own unique lighthouses.

4. I See the Light, by Karen Wordell
3rd & 4th Grade, Social Studies and Language Arts, Art

Unit Overview
This lesson will chart comparisons between lighthouses of the past with present day practices. The students will practice writing skills by taking on the personality of a lighthouse keeper from the past and writing a journal entry about that time period. The students will then create another journal entry by taking on the personality of a US Coast Guard member serving at a lighthouse station today. Students will meet the harbor master and hear information about what changes have occurred over time in the Manitowoc harbor, and to its lighthouse. The students will also sketch a simple map of the harbor - breakwater area, and they will sketch and paint watercolor pictures of the lighthouse in Manitowoc.

5. Pardon, Do You Have the Correct Time?, by Karen Wordell
3rd & 4th Grade, Social Studies and Language Arts, Art

Unit Overview
This lesson is intended for use with the study of Wisconsin State History. Part of that unit of study also includes a study of our local (Manitowoc, WI) history. The students will make connections between our local and our state history.
In this lesson, students will practice gathering information from printed text by reading brief, non-fiction, description pages about the roles that boats have played in the Great Lakes maritime history of northeastern Wisconsin. The students will also gather information by reading other non-fiction information pages about events that have affected our local history. Then, students will construct a timeline by placing the sheets they have read in the correct chronological order. Through a variety of group discussions, students will review and learn new information about how boats and their movement on waterways have been an important part of the economy and history of the area and how they still remain an important part today.

6. Vanish Into Thin Air, by Beth Messman
3rd & 4th Grade, Social Studies and Language Arts

Unit Overview
Students will understand the reliance on the Great Lakes for our fresh water supply. They will review the water cycle in order to understand how precipitation and evaporation affect the lakes’ levels. They will compare real and imaginary causes for lake levels to drop, using maps and graphs to support their investigations. After reading the story The Day the Great Lakes Drained Away, students will create their own sequence of events, either realistic or imaginary, that shows why the Great Lakes water levels drop and how that could affect their community. Students will create public awareness pamphlets that focus attention on warning others of the effects if the Great Lakes really did drain away.

7. The Rouse Simmons: The Christmas Tree Ship, by Patti Thunell
3rd Grade, Language Arts and Social Studies

Unit Overview
Students will use web sites, books, and songs to gather information about the Rouse Simmons, its role, and why it is still remembered. Students will identify reasons why the Rouse Simmons was carrying a cargo of Christmas trees, compare and contrast versions of its sinking, and write a story or article based on what they learned.

8. Michigan Shipping and Products, by Sandra Carey
3rd-4th Grade, Integrated Classroom

Unit Overview
An overview of Great Lakes shipping is presented. Michigan history is reviewed in regards to exploration and ways Native Peoples and explorers traveled. Natural resources available in Michigan, where they are found, how they are shipped, and products made from them are studied. Students will have opportunity to handle and identify those resources used in steel production. Concepts of Inter-Modal Transportation will be studied.

9. Most Wanted!, by Angela Adams
5th Grade, Science and Writing

Unit Overview

A region’s environment is shaped by the life forms that inhabit the area. This lesson will demonstrate how a region’s life forms change based on human intervention and adaptations of the life forms that live in those environments. Largely due to food webs, energy chains, and other environmental factors, all life forms that live in a particular ecological system are interdependent. These life forms are affected by changes to their ecological system. Life forms living in the United States are not static, but are constantly changing due to natural and human activities. Plants and animals not native to Virginia watershed habitats are introduced and subsequently adapt in ways that enable them to survive.

These three-part lessons will introduce and explore Virginia’s non-native species, demonstrate how invasive species can negatively impact the biodiversity of the area, and analyze how life forms including humans and animals intentionally and unintentionally carry non-native species from various parts of the world.

10. The Mighty Workhorse, by Angela Adams
5th Grade, Writing and Social Studies

Unit Overview
Journal writing is a tool that encourages children to “write to learn” where they are engaged in their learning and can reflect on their thinking. Journaling provides the opportunity to describe ideas and feelings, use words and expressions that they have learned, and describe events that happen to them or about interesting people and places. Through this series of lessons that provide an overview of tugboat careers, vocabulary, and Great Lakes mapping skills, students will be given the opportunity to write about topics related to operating a tugboat on the Great Lakes. Interactive lessons are designed to connect information that is introduced to information about things that they already know. Students are given the opportunity to imagine and express topics of personal interest.

MIDDLE SCHOOL
1. How Low Can They Go?, by Amy Gustafson
7th Grade, Science and Math

Unit Overview
This lesson engages students in activities that will enhance their understanding of how and why Great Lakes water levels change, and the impacts of those level fluctuations. Students will use real-world data to create and analyze statistical data displays, and investigate how changing water level fluctuations will affect travel in the Great Lakes.

2. Invasive Species, by Kelly Mottl
7th Grade, Science, Geography

Unit Overview
This lesson will provide background on the Great Lakes and will incorporate and promote maritime education through the lessons. It is common practice to teach about the diversity of species in natural habitats. Biogeography – the transfer of species throughout the earth by various methods – will be addressed in lessons leading up to the lesson on invasive species.

Many plant and animal species depend on the Great Lakes region for survival, but not all of the species are from the Great Lakes region. When non-native species come into a region, by air, over land, or in ballast water, we call these exotic species. These exotic species invade an ecosystem and often create detrimental effects to the local ecosystem because they use up the resources and create economic and ecological problems, such as destroying wetlands and other habitats that native species rely on. It can be very costly and often ineffective to remove exotic species, so prevention of future exotic species movement into the Great Lakes is vital to the health of the Great Lakes Ecosystem. Education our youth is an optimal way of controlling future accidental or deliberate introductions of invasive species.

3. Measure the Lakes, by Kelly Mottl
7th Grade, Science, Geography

Unit Overview
This lesson has been designed to help students use mathematics and the language of science, in the classroom. Students need to be prepared to understand metric and U.S. customary measurements, including how to use tools of measurement, how to convert between one system and another, and how to represent data to the general public. This lesson will provide background on the Great Lakes and will incorporate and promote maritime education into the lessons. It is common practice to teach a measurement unit at the beginning of each science year so students are reminded of the importance of units and conversions for use in labs throughout the year. These lessons are designed to be incorporated into the measurement unit. Other lessons in this unit include a measurement lab, and a measurement test. This portion of the measurement unit will take approximately three days, with one day devoted to learning about the Great Lakes, one day completing a chart making conversions from U.S. Customary measures to Metric measures, and another day for changing metric units to other metric units. Students could use extra time on the third day to drawing posters or make models of characteristics of the Great Lakes. The unit can be adapted to the individual teacher’s classroom by selecting parts of the lesson as needed.

4. Predicting Future Trends in Great Lakes Shipping Using Multiple Representations of Data,
by Laura Scribner
7th/8th Grade, Math

Unit Overview
The students will work in groups using multiple representations (tables, graphs, equations, etc.) to predict trends in shipping. They will also be asked to make educated guesses about what the past has shown and what things might impact the shipping industry future in light of their analysis of the data.

5. Take a Stand: Dredging Controversy, by Laura Scribner
7th/8th Grade, Math

Unit Overview
The students will use the computer lab to survey several teacher-selected websites and then write a persuasive position paper on the issue of dredging. The paper will be evaluated on the writer’s use of supporting information in constructing a sound argument as per the new Common Core Standards.

6. Great Lakes Maritime Lessons, by Tammy Daenzer
7th Grade, Science

Unit Overview
These lesson plans will be incorporated into the Fluid Earth Systems and Human Activities Unit currently taught in 7th grade science. It will follow an introduction to the Hydrosphere, including several activities designed to model where all the water on Earth is located, teach important concepts of a watershed and demonstrate how human activities affect our water resources. These lesson plans will introduce current environmental concerns regarding the condition of the Great Lakes. After completing these lesson plans, students will further explore the Hydrosphere with an emphasis on the ocean and engage in a avariety of activities related to water quality.

7. How Fast, How Far?, by Dennis Simi
8th Grade, Math

Unit Overview
It will be the intention of this 1-day lesson to engage academically disadvantaged and/or challenged students in learning how to correctly make rates of change (speed) calculations and interpret their importance in order to enhance the following learning objectives:

  • Select and use standard tools for measurement of length, time, weight, volume and temperature:
  • Select appropriate units of measure for length, time, weight, volume and temperature
  • Solve problems involving ratio units such as miles per hour, dollars per pound or persons per square mile

8. Where Are We Now?, by Dennis Simi
8th Grade, Math

Unit Overview
It will be the intention of this 2-day lesson to engage academically disadvantaged and/or challenged students in map reading and map making in order to enhance the following learning objectives:

  • Convert one unit of measure to a larger or smaller unit given the conversion factor
  • Find and use locations using simple coordinate systems such as maps and first quadrant grids
  • Read, interpret and use maps and grids with legends, landmarks and city blocks.

HIGH SCHOOL
1. The Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System: An Overview, by David Rowe
8-12 Grade, Science and Social Studies

Unit Overview
Students will learn about the St. Lawrence Seaway by answering questions to a web based assignment. By the end of the lesson the students will be able to:
- List the major commodities coming in and out of the port of Duluth /Superior

  • Identify where the major commodities are coming from and what they are used for
  • Define maritime terms such as Saltie and Laker
  • Compare and contrast monetary and environmental costs associated with different types of transport

2. Friend or Foe?, by Amy Gustafson
10th Grade, Biology

Unit Overview
This is a lesson for 10th grade biology students to choose a non-native species in the great lakes region, and to investigate the effects they have had on that region. Students will be able to access the Internet for research purposes.

3. Quagga Quandary, by Deb Del Zoppo
10th Grade, Biology

Unit Overview
Upon completion, students will be able to identify and articulate the importance of maintaining the correct balance of nutrients across cell membranes and be able to recognize and construct a toxic environment necessary to destroy quagga mussels.

4. Hydrilla/Godzilla, by Deb Del Zoppo
10th Grade, Biology

Unit Overview
This is a kind of “Devil’s Advocate” activity of inquiry-based instruction designed to begin (due to it’s two-week run) before teaching, and run concurrently with, Biomes, Ecosystems and Populations. The instructor will lead students into discovery of the dangers when species cross biomes and adapt, often thriving under non-native conditions. This activity requires focus, team-work, record keeping, and extrapolation of gathered information into long range vision and comprehension.

5. Invasive Species by Troy Averill
9-12 Grade, Math

Unit Overview
Students will be introduced to the ecological and economical impact of invasive species in the Great Lakes and the role of ballast water in bringing those species here. Students will visit the website (http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/) to compile a list of 10 facts learned. Students will read NOAA’s Aquatic Invaders &the Great Lakes brochure and complete a guided reading worksheet. A PowerPoint presentation will be used to provide some basic background. Students will develop an invasive species presentation that will be shared in class, with the best being distributed at curriculum night.

6. Calculating Ballast, by Troy Averill
9-12 Grade, Math

Unit Overview
Students use the dimensions of the cargo hold of a ship’s hull to calculate the volume of material that can be contained. Students will then use the density of material to determine the mass of the potential cargo being transported. Last, students will determine the amount of ballast water that must be pumped out of the ship to maintain the same waterline when the cargo is loaded.

7. Zebra Mussels vs. Quagga Mussels: A Case Study Investigation, by Shanna Tury
9-10 Grade, Science

Unit Overview
Students will investigate aquatic invasive species, namely the zebra and quagga mussel, in order to understand their impact and consequences for the ecology, environment, maritime commerce and economics of the Great Lakes region. This lesson connects to my current curriculum by expanding my ecology unit and offering a case study approach to learning. My students now spend a number of days exploring current ecological issues, but invasive species are not explored in lengthy detail. This activity will allow students to read media articles to perform an in-depth exploration of both species of invasive mussel and critically analyze the similarities and differences between them. Students will explain the causes that brought these organisms to our region, the effects they are having, any possible future consequences of these invasions, and actions we can take to reduce or stop them. It is my hope that my students will gain an increased awareness of aquatic invasive species, their relevance to our region, and the consequences they are having on our ecology, commerce, and economics.

8. Perspectives on Invasive Species in the Great Lakes: An Asian Carp Debate, by Shanna Tury
9-10 Grade, Science

Unit Overview
Students will investigate aquatic invasive species, including the Asian carp, in order to understand their impact and consequences for the ecology, environment, and economics of the Great Lakes region, as well consider political and social issues. This lesson connects to my current curriculum by enhancing my ecology unit and taking it to the next level. My students now spend a number of days exploring current ecological issues, but invasive species is only one of ten topics studied. This activity will allow students to research and perform an in-depth exploration of the Asian carp as an invasive species and debate the various perspectives of the stakeholders involved in this real world issue. It is my hope that my students will gain an increased awareness of aquatic invasive species, their relevance to our region, and the consequences they are having on our ecology, commerce, and economics.



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Last Update: 2/14/2012

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