Western Upper Peninsula Center for Science, Mathematics and Environmental Education

2001-2002 Annual Report

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The Western Upper Peninsula Center for Science, Mathematics and Environmental Education, has offices in the Copper Country Intermediate School District and on Michigan Technological University’s campus. The center provides services to 21 school districts and their communities in  Baraga, Keweenaw, Houghton, Ontonagon and Gogebic counties. The center strives to develop scientifically literate and environmentally committed citizens, scientists and community leaders for the 21st century by providing innovative and quality programming for students, teachers and the community.

 

Overview of the Year’s Accomplishments

 

Ø      387 teachers participated in 6479 hours of professional development offered by the center.

Ø      52 teachers participated in the Earth Science Teacher Training Initiative, which provided knowledge and resources to implement the Earth Science Content Standards in the classroom.

Ø      55 teachers participated in the Educator’s Science and Mathematics Institute Series to help teachers develop standards based classroom teaching units.

Ø      26,388 students participated in the center’s programming.

Ø      864 students participated in 60 after school science and math classes in 20 elementary buildings.

Ø      437 students and teachers in grades 4-9 participated in the Western UP Science Fair.

Ø      2507 students and parents participated in Family Science and Math Night Programs

Ø      11,797 students participated in 250 classroom presentations, assemblies and field trips.

Ø      97 elementary and middle school students participated on 10 FIRST LEGO League teams.

Ø      Placement and training of 13 graduate students in 11 school districts to assist teachers in curriculum alignment and development.

 

 

Organization of the Report

 

This report is organized around the Western Upper Peninsula Center for Science, Mathematics and Environmental Education Three-Year Strategic Plan for 2000-2003.  The Strategic Plan identifies six service areas:  Leadership, Professional Development, Student Services, Curriculum Support, Community Involvement, and Resource Clearinghouse.  In each service area—the goals and quality indicators are described.  Descriptions of strategies used to accomplish these goals and indicators of the effectiveness of the work are also presented.

 

Educational Leadership

 

 

Focus of Leadership Services for 2001-2002

 

1.       The Center will influence policy for mathematics and science education in the region, state and nation, by actively participating in the Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network.         

  1. The Center  will exert leadership in coordinating educational activities in the CCISD and GOISD to provide equal access to services that meet the needs of teachers and students in the service area.
  2. The Center  will provide leadership for schools in the CCISD and GOISD by participating in State Wide Initiatives to improve mathematics and science education.

 

 

Strategies:

Ø      Center staff gathered input and assess needs of school districts using many strategies both formal and informal.

Ø      Center staff  maintained a website and email listserves to provides teachers and administrators with information on programming at the Center, professional development, grant opportunities, educational research and policies.

Ø      Center staff  worked collaboratively with community organizations, various departments at Michigan Technological University and school districts to coordinate programming and leverage resources.

 

Evidence:

·            Information from the formal needs assessment was used to develop the strategic plan for center programming.

 

·            The center was able to obtain funding and resources to enhance programming.

 

·            Teachers and administrators in the service area were more aware of the educational programs offered at the Center and from other organizations.

 

Professional development programs addressed a need for strategies to engage students in inquiry-based activities using higher order thinking skills that provide connections to the real world.

 

Student programming engaged students in inquiry-based activities, promote environmental stewardship and explored careers in math and science related fields.

 

Family Science and Math Night Programs addressed a need for encouraging family participation in the education of their children.

 

Established a resource clearinghouse to address the need for access to scientific equipment and standards-based science and mathematics curricula.

 

The Center obtained National Science Foundation funding to recruited MTU students  to conduct  after -school science classes in 20 elementary schools and provide curriculum support in the classroom.

 

The center worked collaboratively with MTU Education Department to fund and implement the Educator’s Science and Mathematics Institute Series.

 

The participation of students in Center programming increased from  13547 in 2000-2001 to 26, 388 in 2001-2002.

 


In addition to the leadership activities above, the Western Upper Peninsula Center provides leadership by maintaining expertise in state and national initiatives in mathematics and science education, by helping districts implement mathematics and science curricula, and by sharing important information with local schools.  To promote the improvement of mathematics and science education both regionally and state wide, Center staff have also participated in the following committees, task forces or presented at the following conferences.

 

Committees

Michigan Rural Systemic Initiative Advisory Board

Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Executive Board

Michigan State University’s Extension Advisory Board

Keweenaw Community Foundation Advisory Board

Regional Principals’ and Superintendents’ Meeting

Regional School Improvement Committees

 

Presentations

National Science Teachers Association National Conference

Metropolitan Detroit Science Teachers Association Conference

North American Association of Environmental Educators Conference

State of the Lakes, Great Lakes Conference

 

 

Professional Development

 

 

Focus of Professional Development Programming for 2001-2002

 

  1. The Center will support teacher participation in selected professional development programs by leveraging Eisenhower Consortium Funds and assist teachers to become facilitators for such programs.

 

  1. The Center  will partner  with various department at Michigan Technological University to provide high quality professional development opportunities that help teachers implement the state and national standards and model effective teaching.

 

 

 

Strategies:

Ø      Development and implementation of programs to address the need for strategies to engage students in inquiry-based activities using higher order thinking skills, and provide connections to the real world.

Ø      Development and implementation of programs that give teachers the tools and resources to implement the Michigan Content Standards and integrate science and mathematics into other content areas.

Ø      Development and implementation of programs that focus on the development of standards-based classroom teaching units and encourage teachers to share innovative ideas with other teachers.

 

Professional development was delivered in many ways, depending on the identified needs in the service area.  Two primary formats included: (1) single events, lasting from a portion of one day to several consecutive days, focused on a particular topic, skill, or issue, and (2) multiple session events, either a series of sessions with a single focus or a sequence of sessions, one building on the previous one, conducted periodically over a several week/month period.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Participants Receiving Professional Development

 

 

 

Reported Gender**

Position

Participants

# of Indiv.

Total Hours

Males

Females

Admin

Math Tchrs.

Science Tchrs.

Tech

Tchrs.

Combined Subject

Other or Unknown*

Pre-K

 

7

84

1

6

1

 

 

 

5

1

Elementary

 

141

1,684

29

112

5

 

1

1

134

 

Middle/Jr. High

 

26

566

13

12

 

4

11

1

1

9

High School

 

71

1,102.5

45

26

 

18

16

4

 

33

Others*

 

142

3,042

33

62

4

13

15

2

16

92

Total

 

387

6,478.5

121

218

10

35

43

8

156

135

*      Other includes persons who work across grade levels, are not teachers or administrators, or did not indicate position.

**    All individuals did not indicate Gender.

 

 

Table 2: Single Session Professional Development Activities

 

 

 

Math

Science

Technology

Integrated

M/S/T

Other

Total

 

Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-K

Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

# Participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events

 

5

 

4

 

9

 

Elementary

Hours

 

15

 

33

 

48

 

 

# Participants

 

92

 

61

 

153

 

Elementary

Events

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

&

Hours

 

 

 

3

 

3

 

Mid/Jr. High

# Participants

 

 

 

11

 

11

 

 

Events

1

1

 

1

 

3

 

Mid/Jr. High

Hours

1.5

1.5

 

1.5

 

4.5

 

 

# Participants

7

4

 

10

 

21

 

Mid/Jr. High & High School

Events

1

4

1

1

2

9

 

Hours

1.5

15

12

6

3

37.5

 

# Participants

2

74

10

15

43

144

 

 

Events

1

3

 

1

1

6

 

High School

Hours

6

4.5

 

1.5

1.5

13.5

 

 

# Participants

13

16

 

4

5

38

 

 

Other Mixed Levels

Events

 

1

3

4

 

8

 

Hours

 

6

39

36

 

81

 

# Participants

 

26

38

78

 

142

 

Total

Events

3

14

4

12

3

36

 

 

Hours

9

42

51

81

4.5

187.5

 

 

# Participants

22

212

48

179

48

509

 

 


Table 3: Multiple Session Professional Development Activities

 

 

 

Math

Science

Technology

Integrated

M/S/T

Other

Total

 

Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-K

Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

# Participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events

2

7

 

 

 

9

Elementary

Hours

12

35

 

 

 

47

 

# Participants

42

158

 

 

 

200

Elementary

Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

&

Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mid/Jr. High

# Participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mid/Jr. High

Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

# Participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mid/Jr. High & High School

Events

2

2

 

1

 

5

Hours

12

12

 

6

 

30

# Participants

35

22

 

7

 

64

 

Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

High School

Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

# Participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Mixed Levels

Events

 

 

 

4

 

4

Hours

 

 

 

160

 

160

# Participants

 

 

 

55

 

55

Total

Events

4

9

 

5

 

18

 

Hours

24

47

 

166

 

237

 

# Participants

77

180

 

62

 

319

 

 

Teaching, Assessment, and Curriculum Development

§         Educators’ Science and Mathematics Institute Series

§         Earth Science Teacher Training Initiative

§         Scientific Method Workshops

§         2002 Mathematics Leadership Workshops

§         Teacher to Teacher Conference

§         Environmental Stewardship Workshops

§         Teaching with Outdoors Conference

§         Family Science and Math Leadership Workshops

§         Writing Instructional Rubrics Workshop

 

Technology

 

§         Geographical Information Systems Workshops

§         Stream Monitoring and Applied Watershed Science Workshop

 

 

 

 

 


Evidence:

·         Professional development programs resulted in increased participation in student programs.

·         Teachers shared ideas and teaching strategies with other teachers.

·         Teachers created standards based teaching unit plans.

·         Teachers incorporated  technology into the classroom to improve instruction.

·         Teachers from 9 out of 12 school districts identified by MDE as low achieving in science participated in professional development programs offered by the Center.

·      The participation of students in school science fairs and the Western UP Science Fair increased due to teacher participation in the scientific method workshops.

·      Student participation in stream monitoring projects has increased due to teacher participation in the Stream Monitoring Workshop.

·      Teachers in the same building  implemented cross-curricular teaching units as a result of their participation in the Center’s professional development programs. 

·      Professional development participants took leadership roles by acting as workshop facilitators

·      Teaching units from institute participants have been published in NSTA, MCTM and ENC journals.

·      A compilation of the teaching units from ESMIS participants is available on center’s website, http://wupcenter.mtu.edu.

·      Teachers are using GPS and CBLs in their classroom and student projects.

 

 

 

 

Student Services

 

 

Focus of Student Services Programming for 2001-2002

 

  1. The Center will work with Michigan Technological University, area schools and community organizations to support, develop and implement science and mathematics programs that focus on the standards of authentic achievement such as higher order thinking, substantive conversation and connections to the real world.

 

Student services were based on identified needs to improve and enhance mathematics and science education. Based on national trends, MEAP scores, and other standardized methods of assessment; there is a need to provide all students in the service area access to quality mathematics, science, and technology programs. Students who participate in the Western UP Center’s enrichment activities had the opportunity to explore new concepts, develop process skills, cooperate on group tasks, and discuss their findings.  Many student programs were coordinated with teacher professional development program providing an effective way to impact the teaching and learning of science, mathematics and technology.

 

 

Strategies:

Ø      Implementation or support of programming that engages students in activities that encourage higher order thinking skills and provide connections to the real world.

Ø      Implementation of programming that focuses on careers in science, mathematics or technology related field.

Ø      Implementation of programming that promotes environmental stewardship and sustainability.

Ø      Coordination of student programming and teacher  professional development programs 

 


Table 4: Student Services Activities

 

 

Math

Science

Technology

Integrated

M/S/T

Other

Total

 

Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-K

Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

# Participants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Events

7

294

 

168

10

479

Elementary

Hours

13.5

444.5

 

266

20

744

 

# Participants

145

8,119

 

7,847

238

16,349

Elementary

Events

 

35

 

83

 

118

&

Hours

 

56

 

113.5

 

169.5

Mid/Jr. High

# Participants

 

898

 

6,867

 

7,765

 

Events

1

13

1

3

 

18

Mid/Jr. High

Hours

1

31.5

4

25

 

61.5

 

# Participants

38

1,143

100

138

 

1,419

Mid/Jr. High & High School

Events

 

1

 

 

 

1

Hours

 

1

 

 

 

1

# Participants

 

140

 

 

 

140

 

Events

 

3

 

 

 

3

High School

Hours

 

1.5

 

 

 

1.5

 

# Participants

 

137

 

 

 

137

Other mixed levels

Events

 

3

 

1

 

4

Hours

 

31

 

1

 

32

# Participants

 

266

 

312

 

578

Total

Events

8

349

1

255

10

623

 

Hours

14.5

565.5

4

405.5

20

1,009.5

 

# Participants

183

10,703

100

15,164

238

26,388

Students may have participated in more than one event.  This number represents the total number enrolled in the 623 events.

 

Mathematics and science enrichment programs:

§         After School Science Classes

§         Physics Day Program

§         Support of Science Olympiad teams

§         Support of MATHCOUNTS teams

§         Math+Science = Choices Conference

§         Western UP Science Fair

§         Family Math and Science Nights

§         FIRST LEGO League Teams

Environmental Education Programs

·         Lake Superior Assembly Program

·         “We Can Make A Difference” Earth Week Programs

·         Classroom Presentation Programs for elementary and middle school students.

·        Family Forest Nights

·        Forest Field Trip Program

 

Evidence:

·         Evidence of increased student interest in science and mathematics.

·         Student programs are valued as integral part of school districts educational program.

·         Development of new classroom presentations, field trips, assembly programs and after school classes due to demand.

·         12 out of 12 school districts identified by MDE as low achieving in science participated in student programming offered by the Center.

·      11,797 students participated in 250 classroom presentations, assemblies and field trips.

·      Increased participation of students in school science fairs and the Western UP Science Fair.

·      951 students from 20 elementary schools participated in the after school science program.

·      1151 students participated in the Earth Day Make A Difference Program.

·      Survey results of the participants of the after school program  showed that 96% of the participants would like to take more science and math after -school classes.

·      Center programs are highlighted in individual school districts annual reports, brochures, newsletters and Title 1 reports.

 

 

Curriculum Support

 

 

 

Focus of Curriculum Support for 2001-2002

1.       The Center will cooperate with schools in the CCISD and GOISD in implementing their school improvement plans.

  1. The Center will participate in the efforts of the Department of Education to enhance the science and mathematics curricula in our local schools.
  2. The Center will work with local schools and districts to align their mathematics and science curricula and instructional materials to the Michigan Content Standards and Benchmarks. Professional development will be delivered to give teachers the training and resources to implement the curriculum effectively and engage students in authentic learning and assessment.

 

 

Curriculum support is a service to help school districts develop curricula incorporating both national research in teaching and learning and in alignment with Michigan’s Curriculum Frameworks.

 

Strategies:

Ø      The placement and training of 13 graduate students from MTU to assist teachers in the development of mathematics and science curricula that address science, mathematics and technology standards and promotes inquiry based learning.

Ø      Involve teachers and administrators in statewide initiatives focusing on curriculum alignment and improved instruction.

Ø      Development and implementation of teacher institutes that facilitate the creation of innovative teaching units that address the state and national standards and engage students in authentic learning and assessment.

Ø      Implementation of programs that give teachers the training and resources to integrate standards-based activities into their school’s curriculum effectively.

 

Professional Development :

 

  • Educators’ Science and Mathematics Institute Series

·         Earth Science Teacher Training Initiative

·         2002 Mathematics MEAP Leadership Workshops.

·         Instructional Rubrics Workshop

 

Consultation or Committee Work:

·         Placement and training of 13 graduate students in 10 school districts to assist teachers in curriculum alignment and development  (6 of these 10 districts were identified by MDE as low achieving in science).

·         Provided assistance to school improvement committees in the Lake Linden, Hancock, Ironwood, Stanton, Calumet and Ontonagon Districts.

 

 

Evidence:

·         Development and implementation of standards-based teaching units.

·         Increase use of inquiry- based activities in the classroom.

·         Teachers from 9 out of 12 school districts identified by MDE as low achieving in science participated in professional development programs offered by the Center.

·      An extensive collection of innovative standards based teaching units from ESMIS Institute and MTU Graduate Fellows can be found on the center’s website, http://wupcenter.mtu.edu.

·      Institute participants are required to implement their teaching units in their classroom and present student work at a peer review sessions.

·      School science fairs involving the scientific method have become part of the science curriculum in 8 districts.

Community Involvement

 

 

Focus of Community Involvement for 2001-2002
  1. The Center will develop and implement programs in science and mathematics education for the local community.

 

  1. The Center will seek community support and involvement in center programming to enhance science and mathematics education.

 

  1. The Center will communicate to stakeholders and the community, the value of center programming in promoting literacy in science and mathematics.

 

 

Community involvement increases the awareness of the Western UP Center, and provides resources for innovative educational programming.  The Center staff continues to encourage relationships with local businesses, universities and community colleges, museums, and community groups. Partnerships have been forged with Michigan Technological University, Finlandia University, Copper Country Americorps, Michigan Sea Grant, Keweenaw Community Foundation, Keweenaw Land Trust, MSU Extension, Michigan Department of Natural Resources and National Park Services- Isle Royale and Pictured Rocks.

 

Strategies:

Ø      Provide programming that encourages parent involvement in education of their children.

Ø      Leverage community resources in the development and implementation of professional development and student programming.

Ø      Develop and implement community programs that promote environmental stewardship and literacy in science and mathematics.

Partnerships with Universities, and Colleges

 

·         Family Science and Math Night Program sessions conducted by MTU students.

·         ESMIS Institute sessions conducted by MTU faculty and resource professionals.

·         MTU faculty and honor society members act as judges and volunteers for the Western UP Science Fair.

·         Science and Mathematics Methods Training for pre-service teachers, classroom volunteers and substitute teachers.

 

Relationships with Business, Industry, & Community Organizations

§         Community volunteers serve as presenters for Family Science and Math Night Programs.

§         Community and resource professionals assisted in the  development and implementation of  Earth Science Teacher Training Initiative, Teaching with the Outdoors Conference and ESMIS Institutes.

 

Community and Family Programs

·                                             Family Science and Math Night Programs

·                                             Math + Science = Choices Conference

·                                             Watershed and Stream Monitoring Presentations

·                                             School Forest Presentations.

·                                             2002 Mathematics MEAP Parents Workshop

 

 

Evidence:

·         Regular participation of community volunteers, MTU faculty and MTU students in center programming.

·         Increased parent participation in family programs.

 

·      2507 students and parents  participated in Family Science and Math Night Programs at 20 elementary schools.

·      60 MTU students and community volunteers conducted family night sessions.

·      50 MTU faculty and 18 honor society members volunteered their time to help with the Western UP Science Fair.

 


Resource Clearinghouse

 

 

Focus of Resource Clearinghouse Services for 2001-2002
 
1.       The Center will provide teacher resources that support standards based curriculum, inquiry- oriented instruction and authentic assessment.
  1. The Center will maintain and utilize email listserves of teachers and administrators to provide information about professional development opportunities, student enhancement opportunities and curriculum issues.

 

 

 

The Western UP Center serves as a resource clearinghouses that, in collaboration Michigan Technological University , Finlandia  University and community organizations, to collect and disseminate information, acquire and distribute materials and human resources.

 

Strategies:

Ø      Establish a resource clearinghouse of standards based activity guides, scientific equipment, children’s literature, and teacher resources that can be checked out and distributed through the REMC 1 system to individual schools.

Ø      Maintain a website that contain information about of all the center’s programs and the resource clearinghouse.

Ø      Maintain listserves of teachers and administrators to distribute information about center programming and other educational issues.

 

Evidence:

·        Information about  programming can be found at http://wupcenter.mtu.edu

·        Teachers and administrators can register for programs via email.

·        Resource clearinghouse is fully operational.

·      The Center website is regularly updated with new programming, pictures and educational information.

·      Many teachers registered for programs via email.

·      Catalog of items in the Resource Clearinghouse was distributed to teachers in the Fall of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Personnel, Facilities, Funding

 

Title

M/F

Ethnicity

FTE at Center

Degree

Area of Expertise

Years Teaching

Years at Center

Shawn Oppliger

Director

F

Caucasian

1.0

MS

 

Science

Mathematics

13.0

3.5

Joan Chadde

Program Coordinator

F

Caucasian

1.0

MS

Science

4.0

2.0

Katie Walch

Education Specialist

F

Caucasian

1.0

BS

Science

1.0

1.0

Michael Buenzli

Field Trip Coordinator

M

Caucasian

0.5

BS

Natural Resources

1.0

1.0

Barb McTaggart

Education Specialist

F

Caucasian

0.5

PhD

Geology

Science

4.0

3.0

Loret Robert

Secretary

F

Caucasian

0.5

BS

Commercial Art, Graphics

0.0

1.5

 

Facilities:

The Western UP Center has offices at the Copper Country Intermediate School District (CCISD) and on Michigan Technological University’s (MTU) campus.  The Copper Country ISD, the fiscal agent, provides in-kind: office space, computer support, overhead, business and administrative support for the director and secretary.  REMC 1 located at the CCISD provides in-kind space and the distribution network for the resources clearinghouse.  MTU provides in kind: office space, computer support and overhead for the Program Coordinator and Education Specialists. 

 

Home base facilities used regularly:   

The distance learning room, computer lab and board room at the CCISD and the Memorial Union and various classrooms at MTU are used on a regular basis for professional development program and student programming.  Both the CCISD and MTU provide these facilities free of charge.

 

Community sites used by the Center:  

The Ford Forestry Center was the site of ESMIS Institutes.  Houghton High School was the site of the Teacher to Teacher Conference.  The forest field trips were conducted at various school forests in the area and the Family Science and Math Night Programs, Classroom Presentation Program and After-School Science Program were conducted at local elementary and middle schools.

                                                               

Major Equipment:

Each office has computers, printers, copier, office furniture and fiber access to the internet.  These are provided in kind by the CCISD and MTU.

 

Summary

The Western Upper Peninsula Center for Science, Mathematics and Environmental Education is a partnership of Michigan Technological University, Copper Country Intermediate School District and Gogebic- Ontonagon Intermediate School District.  This partnership has allowed the Western UP Center to leverage resources and seek additional funding to provide quality programming to 21 districts in the Copper Country Intermediate School District and Gogebic-Ontonagon Intermediate School District. The service area of the Center spans 4, 469 square miles, two different time zones and it is the largest geographical area of the 33 Michigan Math and Science Centers.  The staff  strived to provide quality programming equally to all district in this service area.

The schools received student programming, such as after- science classes, family science, classroom presentations  and field trips on- site at their individual schools. This programming has become an integral part of the districts’ educational  program.  Teachers in the service area had the opportunity to participate in high quality, meaningful professional development  that impacted the teaching and learning in their classroom.